• In a study experiment done by a clinic in California, United States, 32 patients who had experienced stroke were divided into two groups to try rehabilitation within 4 months in two different approaches; conventional and modern VR.
• The authors evaluated the potential of a 2D video-capture VR training environment to improve UL motor ability in stroke patients compared to conventional therapy via a small sample RCT.
• Although improvements occurred in both groups, more patients in VR improved UL clinical impairment at the ICF Body Structure and Function Level (FMA, CSI) as well as scores at the Activity level of the ICF (WMFT).
• Changes did not occur at the Performance level and the WMFT was found to be more sensitive to post-practice changes than the MAL. Participants expressed satisfaction with the novel treatment.
• The authors found that clinical impairment and activity improved to the same or better extent when therapy was delivered in the 2D VR environment as compared to the conventional physical environment.
• These improvements occurred in spite of evidence that movement patterns used to produce reaching movements might be different from those performed in physical environments for equivalent tasks.