Worldwide, the population faces high incidence rates of stroke and post-stroke sequelae with an
increased need for neurorehabilitation services. Stroke complications can be long-lasting; thus, at 15-years post-stroke, two-thirds of survivors live with a disability, nearly two of five suffer from depression, and more than a quarter have cognitive impairment. Post-stroke disability significantly contributes to the increasing use of long-term medical care resources, thus highlighting that efficient rehabilitation can cut costs in the healthcare system. The use of virtual reality technology has
been studied and proved to be effective in improving patients’ functional rehabilitation.Research on neuroplasticity and learning or relearning abilities shows that there are several principles of motor learning, including multisensory stimulation, explicit feedback, knowledge of results, and motor imagery. These principles, notably explicit feedback and multisensory stimulation, are found in the VR technology used for neuromotor rehabilitation. Accordingly, VR therapy becomes an alternative to classical physiotherapy, as it develops neuroplasticity.